The Air We Breathe

Frankincense

Frankincense, also known as olibanum, is made from the resin of the Boswellia tree. It typically grows in the dry, mountainous regions of India, Africa and the Middle East.

Frankincense has a woody, spicy smell and can be inhaled, absorbed through the skin, steeped into a tea or taken as a supplement.

Used in Ayurvedic medicine for hundreds of years, frankincense appears to offer certain health benefits, from improved arthritis and digestion to reduced asthma and better oral health. It may even help fight certain types of cancer.

1. May Reduce Arthritis

Frankincense has anti-inflammatory effects that may help reduce joint inflammation caused by osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Researchers believe that frankincense can prevent the release of leukotrienes, which are compounds that can cause inflammation (1Trusted Source2Trusted Source).

Terpenes and boswellic acids appear to be the strongest anti-inflammatory compounds in frankincense (3Trusted Source4Trusted Source).

Test-tube and animal studies note that boswellic acids may be as effective as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — with fewer negative side effects (5Trusted Source).

In humans, frankincense extracts may help reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (6).

In one recent review, frankincense was consistently more effective than a placebo at reducing pain and improving mobility (7).

In one study, participants given 1 gram per day of frankincense extract for eight weeks reported less joint swelling and pain than those given a placebo. They also had a better range of movement and were able to walk further than those in the placebo group (8Trusted Source).

In another study, boswellia helped reduce morning stiffness and the amount of NSAID medication needed in people with rheumatoid arthritis (9Trusted Source).

That said, not all studies agree and more research is needed (610Trusted Source).

SUMMARYFrankincense’s anti-inflammatory effects may help reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. However more high-quality studies are needed to confirm these effects.

2. May Improve Gut Function

Frankincense’s anti-inflammatory properties may also help your gut function properly.

This resin appears particularly effective at reducing symptoms of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, two inflammatory gut diseases. 

In one small study in people with Crohn’s disease, frankincense extract was as effective as the pharmaceutical drug mesalazine at reducing symptoms (11Trusted Source).

Another study gave people with chronic diarrhea 1,200 mg of boswellia — the tree resin frankincense is made from — or a placebo each day. After six weeks, more participants in the boswellia group had cured their diarrhea compared to those given the placebo (12Trusted Source).

What’s more, 900–1,050 mg of frankincense daily for six weeks proved as effective as a pharmaceutical in treating chronic ulcerative colitis — and with very few side effects (13Trusted Source14Trusted Source).

However, most studies were small or poorly designed. Therefore, more research is needed before strong conclusions can be made.

SUMMARYFrankincense may help reduce symptoms of Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis by reducing inflammation in your gut. However, more research is needed.

3. Improves Asthma

Traditional medicine has used frankincense to treat bronchitis and asthma for centuries.

Research suggests that its compounds may prevent the production of leukotrienes, which cause your bronchial muscles to constrict in asthma (5Trusted Source).

In one small study in people with asthma, 70% of participants reported improvements in symptoms, such as shortness of breath and wheezing, after receiving 300 mg of frankincense three times daily for six weeks (15Trusted Source).

Similarly, a daily frankincense dose of 1.4 mg per pound of body weight (3 mg per kg) improved lung capacity and helped reduce asthma attacks in people with chronic asthma (16).

Lastly, when researchers gave people 200 mg of a supplement made from frankincense and the South Asian fruit bael (Aegle marmelos), they found that the supplement was more effective than a placebo at reducing asthma symptoms (17Trusted Source).

SUMMARYFrankincense may help reduce the likelihood of asthma attacks in susceptible people. It may also relieve asthma symptoms, such as shortness of breath and wheezing.

4. Maintains Oral Health

Frankincense may help prevent bad breath, toothaches, cavities and mouth sores. 

The boswellic acids it provides appear to have strong antibacterial properties, which may help prevent and treat oral infections (18Trusted Source).

In one test-tube study, frankincense extract was effective against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a bacteria which causes aggressive gum disease (19Trusted Source).

In another study, high school students with gingivitis chewed a gum containing either 100 mg of frankincense extract or 200 mg of frankincense powder for two weeks. Both gums were more effective than a placebo at reducing gingivitis (20Trusted Source).

However, more human studies are needed to confirm these results.

SUMMARYFrankincense extract or powder may help fight gum disease and maintain oral health. However, more studies are needed.

5. May Fight Certain Cancers

Frankincense may also help fight certain cancers

The boswellic acids it contains might prevent cancer cells from spreading (2122Trusted Source).

A review of test-tube studies notes that boswellic acids may also prevent the formation of DNA in cancerous cells, which could help limit cancer growth (1Trusted Source).

Moreover, some test-tube research shows that frankincense oil may be able to distinguish cancer cells from normal ones, killing only the cancerous ones (23Trusted Source).

So far, test-tube studies suggest that frankincense may fight breast, prostate, pancreatic, skin and colon cancer cells (22Trusted Source24Trusted Source25Trusted Source26Trusted Source27Trusted Source).

One small study indicates that it may also help reduce side effects of cancer.

When people getting treated for brain tumors took 4.2 grams of frankincense or a placebo each day, 60% of the frankincense group experienced reduced brain edema — an accumulation of fluid in the brain — compared to 26% of those given the placebo (28Trusted Source).

However, more research in humans is needed.

SUMMARYCompounds in frankincense may help kill cancer cells and prevent tumors from spreading. However, more human research is needed.

Common Myths

Although frankincense is praised for multiple health benefits, not all of them are backed by science. 

The 7 following claims have very little evidence behind them: 

  1. Helps prevent diabetes: Some small studies report that frankincense may help lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. However, recent high-quality studies found no effect (29Trusted Source30Trusted Source).
  2. Reduces stress, anxiety and depression: Frankincense may reduce depressive behavior in mice, but no studies in humans have been done. Studies on stress or anxiety are also lacking (31Trusted Source).
  3. Prevents heart disease: Frankincense has anti-inflammatory effects which may help reduce the type of inflammation common in heart disease. However, no direct studies in humans exist (32Trusted Source).
  4. Promotes smooth skin: Frankincense oil is touted as an effective natural anti-acne and anti-wrinkle remedy. However, no studies exist to support these claims. 
  5. Improves memory: Studies show that large doses of frankincense may help boost memory in rats. However, no studies have been done in humans (33Trusted Source34Trusted Source35Trusted Source).
  6. Balances hormones and reduces symptoms of PMS: Frankincense is said to delay menopause and reduce menstrual cramping, nausea, headaches and mood swings. No research confirms this.
  7. Enhances fertility: Frankincense supplements increased fertility in rats, but no human research is available (32Trusted Source).

While very little research exists to support these claims, very little exists to deny them, either.

However, until more studies are done, these claims can be considered myths.

SUMMARYFrankincense is used as an alternative remedy for a wide array of conditions. However, many of its uses are not supported by research.

Effective Dosage

As frankincense can be consumed in a variety of ways, its optimal dosage is not understood. The current dosage recommendations are based on doses used in scientific studies. 

Most studies use frankincense supplements in tablet form. The following dosages were reported as most effective (5Trusted Source):

  • Asthma: 300–400 mg, three times per day
  • Crohn’s disease: 1,200 mg, three times per day
  • Osteoarthritis: 200 mg, three times per day
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: 200–400 mg, three times per day
  • Ulcerative colitis: 350–400 mg, three times per day
  • Gingivitis: 100–200 mg, three times per day

Aside from tablets, studies have also used frankincense in gum — for gingivitis — and creams — for arthritis. That said, no dosage information for creams is available (20Trusted Source36Trusted Source).

If you’re considering supplementing with frankincense, talk to your doctor about a recommended dosage.

SUMMARYFrankincense dosage depends on the condition you’re trying to treat. The most effective dosages range from 300–400 mg taken three times per day.

Possible Side Effects

Frankincense is considered safe for most people.

It has been used as a remedy for thousands of years without any severe side effects, and the resin has a low toxicity (32Trusted Source).

Doses above 900 mg per pound of body weight (2 grams per kg) were found to be toxic in rats and mice. However, toxic doses haven’t been studied in humans (37).

The most common side effects reported in scientific studies were nausea and acid reflux (5Trusted Source).

Some research reports that frankincense may increase the risk of miscarriage in pregnancy, so pregnant women may want to avoid it (5Trusted Source).

Frankincense may also interact with some medications, particularly anti-inflammatory drugs, blood thinners and cholesterol-lowering pills (5Trusted Source).

If you’re taking any of these medicines, make sure to discuss frankincense with your healthcare provider before using it.

SUMMARYFrankincense is considered safe for most people. However, pregnant women and those taking certain types of medication may want to avoid it.

The Bottom Line

Frankincense is used in traditional medicine to treat a wide variety of medical conditions. 

This resin may benefit asthma and arthritis, as well as gut and oral health. It may even have cancer-fighting properties. 

While it has few side effects, pregnant womenand people taking prescription medications may want to talk to their doctor before taking frankincense. 

If you’re curious about this aromatic product, you’ll find that it’s widely available and easy to try.

Published by maryshannonhurst

My name is Mary Shannon Hurst, I am a mother of three children, and two grandchildren. Making the transition navigating my way through teenage pregnancy, motherhood, marriages, divorces and navigating sisterhood, job skills training, community relations, international relations, cultural relations, and educating children begins as soon as they are conceived from the foods that go into their mouths the nutrition that they eat, if they get enough sunshine, and exercise fresh air hugs and love and attention. I believe there is a reason and a purpose for everything, from scribbles, to spilled paint, over spray happens, paint bleeds, chalk dust gets up your nose you sneeze. Just like pollen in the air, and dust in the air makes you sneeze and some people pee a little but when they sneeze. If you make a mistake, or have an accident you clean it up. You laugh, a little or cry a little or a lot and go on about your day, you own it. Clean up your mess. Always find a reason to smile, find some joy in everyday. Always be kind. And Pay it Forward. Tell someone you Love them, Have a Nice Blessed Day!

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